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They decided to use the 6Ds to strengthen their ties to the business, drive learning transfer, and ensure that training delivered business impact. They started spreading the idea of a new finish line; that a leadership development experience isn’t finished until leaders have transferred and applied their new skills and knowledge. The learning Center staff kept repeating the message about business outcomes and began including transfer and achievement phases in program plans and descriptions.

And themessagebegan to stick. “The concept of the new finish line for learning has struck a resonant chord here and across our enterprise,” Terrence told us, “A global manufacturing company like Emerson really understands the concept of manufacturing scrap, so the concept of learning scrap has hit some people like a thunderbolt.”

For example, one of the business unit presidents recorded a video for all supervisors in his company, outlining his expectations of them to drive learning transfer and provide performance support and how he intended to hold them accountable for outcomes. In India, front-line supervisors attending Leading at Emerson 2.0 are so excited about the implementation phase that they are calling their facilitators to share their successes.

In the company’s 2015 Professional Development Learning Guide, the senior vice president for human resources, Michael Rohret, wrote. “We are making a significant investment in your future… don’t become a victim of learning scrap. Attending a workshop and not applying what you learned is a wasted investment. To make sure your learning investments bring a return, we introduced a new finish line for learning.”

They decided to use the 6Ds to strengthen their ties to the business, drive learning transfer, and ensure that training delivered business impact. They started spreading the idea of a new finish line; that a leadership development experience isn’t finished until leaders have transferred and applied their new skills and knowledge. The learning Center staff kept repeating the message about business outcomes and began including transfer and achievement phases in program plans and descriptions.

And themessagebegan to stick. “The concept of the new finish line for learning has struck a resonant chord here and across our enterprise,” Terrence told us, “A global manufacturing company like Emerson really understands the concept of manufacturing scrap, so the concept of learning scrap has hit some people like a thunderbolt.”

For example, one of the business unit presidents recorded a video for all supervisors in his company, outlining his expectations of them to drive learning transfer and provide performance support and how he intended to hold them accountable for outcomes. In India, front-line supervisors attending Leading at Emerson 2.0 are so excited about the implementation phase that they are calling their facilitators to share their successes.

In the company’s 2015 Professional Development Learning Guide, the senior vice president for human resources, Michael Rohret, wrote. “We are making a significant investment in your future… don’t become a victim of learning scrap. Attending a workshop and not applying what you learned is a wasted investment. To make sure your learning investments bring a return, we introduced a new finish line for learning.”